Category Archives: Stadiums In Mumbai

Mumbai Indians (MI) full squad for IPL 2016, Mumbai Indians (MI) IPL 2016 Schedule

Mumbai Indians Team Squad IPL 2016

  1. Rohit Sharma
  2. Jos Buttler
  3. Harbhajan Singh
  4. Kieron Pollard
  5. Lendl Simmons
  6. Tim Southee
  7. Unmukt Chand
  8. Ambati Rayudu
  9. Lasith Malinga
  10. Vinay Kumar
  11. Mitchell McClenaghan
  12. Parthiv Patel
  13. Jasprit Bumrah
  14. Corey Anderson
  15. Marchant de Lange
  16. Shreyas Gopal
  17. Akshay Wakhar
  18. Jagadeesha Suchith
  19. Hardik Pandya
  20. Siddhesh Lad
  21. Nitish Rana
  22. Nathu Singh
  23. Jitesh Sharma
  24. Krunal Pandya
  25. Deepak Punia
  26. Kishore Kamath

Mumbai Indians Team IPL 2016 Schedule

Date
Match
Venue
Time (IST)
09-04-2016
Mumbai Indians vs Rising Pune Supergiants
Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai
20:00
13-04-2016
Kolkata Knight Riders vs Mumbai Indians
Eden Gardens, Kolkata
20:00
16-04-2016
Mumbai Indians vs Gujarat Lions
Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai
20:00
18-04-2016
Sunrisers Hyderabad Vs Mumbai Indians
Rajiv Gandhi International Cricket Stadium, Hyderabad
20:00
23-04-2016
Delhi Daredevils vs Mumbai Indians
Ferozeshah Kotla, Delhi
16:00
25-04-2016
Kings XI vs Mumbai Indians
Punjab Cricket Association Stadium, Mohali
20:00
28-04-2016
Mumbai Indians vs Kolkata Knight Riders
Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai
20:00
01-05-2016
Rising Pune Supergiants vs Mumbai Indians
.MCA International Stadium, Pune
20:00
08-05-2016
Mumbai Indians VS Sunrisers Hyderabad
Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai
16:00
13-05-2016
Mumbai Indians VS Kings XI Punjab
Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai
20:00
15-05-2016
Mumbai Indians VS Delhi Daredevils
Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai
16:00
21-05-2016
Gujarat Lions VS Mumbai Indians
TBC, TBC
20:00
KNOCKOUT STAGE
Date
Match
Venue
Time (IST)
24-05-2016
Qualifier 1: TBC vs TBC
M. Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bengaluru
20:00
25-05-2016
Eliminator: TBC vs TBC
MCA International Stadium, Pune
20:00
27-05-2016
Qualifier 2: TBC vs TBC
MCA International Stadium, Pune
20:00
29-05-2016
Final: TBC vs TBC
Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai
20:00


Wankhede Stadium Mumbai

General Information About Wankhede Stadium Mumbai:

  • Location: D Road, Churchgate, Mumbai
  • Established: 1974
  • Seating Capacity: 45,000
  • Floodlights: Yes
  • Specialty:International Cricket Matches
  • End Names: Garware Pavilion End, Tata End
  • Home Team: Mumbai
  • Owner: Mumbai Cricket Association
  • First Test: India vs. West Indies – Jan 23-29, 1975
  • First ODI: India vs. Sri Lanka – Jan 17, 1987
  • First Match Played: January 23, 1975 – West Indies beat India by 201 runs
  • Last Match Played: March 18, 2006 – England beat India by 212 runs
  • Matches Played: 21
  • Matches Tied: 0
  • No Result: 6
  • Most Successful Team: India
  • Wins by Team Batting First: 10
  • Wins by Team Batting Second: 5
  • Most Prolific Batsman: Sunil Gavaskar (1122 Runs)
  • Highest Individual Score: 242 by Clive Lloyd
  • Most Prolific Bowler: Anil Kumble (38 Wickets)
  • Best Bowling Analysis: 7/48 by Harbhajan Singh

More Information About Wankhede Stadium Mumbai:

Wankhede Stadium is the largest cricket stadium in Mumbai. Wankhade Stadium was the outcome of some disputes over ticket allocations that arose between the Cricket Club of India, the owner of Brabourne Stadium and Mumbai Cricket Association (MCA). In 1973, after the Test between India and England, the dispute became severe and at the initiative of S.K. Wankhede, a politician and the Secretary of MCA, a new stadium was built near the Churchgate in South Mumbai. Wankhede Stadium got test status in 1974, when it hosted a match between India and the touring West Indies. It is the largest cricket stadium in Mumbai. Wankhede Stadium was born out the dispute between Cricket Club of India and Bombay Cricket Association. Wankhede Stadium has seen some wonderful display of both batting and bowling. It was here that Sunil Gavaskar made his fighting 205 against the fearsome West Indian bowling attack in 1978-79 series. In 1980 Ian Botham won the admiration of the fans in Wankhede Stadium by his wonderful display with a century and three wickets. Also an integral part of these wonderful memories is Ravi Shastri six sixes in first class cricket. Today, Wankhede Stadium has taken over Brabourne Stadium in all respect; with a whopping sitting capacity of 45,000 audiences the stadium offers a top-end cricketing spectacle. Wankhede Stadium is a cricket stadium that was established in 1975. Nobody knew that a dispute between the Cricket Club of India (CCI) and Mumbai Cricket Association (MCA) would result into the largest cricket stadium in Mumbai. In 1973, a dispute over ticket allocations cropped up, after the test match between India and England. It became so severe that S.K. Wankhede (a politician and the Secretary of MCA) instantly took the decision of making a new stadium at Churchgate in South Mumbai (or Bombay). One of the two major cricket grounds in the city of Mumbai, Wankhede stadium was established in 1974, in a record time of 6 months. It is barely a few kilometers away from Brabourne stadium, the next cricketing venue in Mumbai. Before the establishment of Wankhede stadium, Brabourne stadium used to host all the Test matches allocated to Mumbai. The Bombay Cricket Association had a dispute with the authorities (the Cricket Club of India) of Brabourne stadium. Consequently, it decided to build its own stadium, which is now called Wankhede stadium. In the present time, Wankhede stadium is the venue for a number of important Test and ODI matches. Read on to know more about the stadium. Wankhede stadium has been hosting international cricket matches since 1975, the first being the Test in the 1974-75 season, when the West Indies toured India. Since then, it has taken over from Brabourne as the main cricketing venue in the city. In 1995, Wankhade stadium underwent an up-gradation drive, during which, floodlights were installed to provide excellent lighting for the day and night cricket matches hosted by it. The stadium holds a special place, because no other India cricketing venues have produced as many legendary cricketers as the Wankhede stadium has. Wankhede stadium has seen some classic sports and it has been witness to great innings like Gavaskar’s 205 against the Windies and Kallicharan’s 187 in the same game in the 1978-79 series. It was the same ground where all round heroics like Ian Botham’s century and thirteen wickets in the Jubilee Test unleashed complete mania in 1980 when England won by ten wickets. The highest score by an Indian at Wankhede remains Vinod Kambli’s 224 against England in 1992-93 in only his third Test. Incidentally Ravi Shastri’s six sixes in an over off Baroda’s Tilak Raj en route to the fastest double-hundred in first-class cricket was on this ground in 1984-85. Mumbai, the cricket capital of India, has seen Test matches played at three different grounds. The Bombay Gymkhana ground hosted the first ever Test in India, in 1933-34 against England. After WW-II, the Cricket Club of India’s Brabourne Stadium was used for 17 Tests. However, due to a dispute between the CCI and the Bombay Cricket Association, the BCA built the 45000-capacity Wankhede Stadium, less than a mile away from the Brabourne Stadium. It staged its first Test in the 1974-75 season when the Windies toured India. Clive Lloyd scored an unbeaten 242 and in Pataudi’s last hurrah, India lost by 201 runs. The Test also featured a crowd disturbance after a fan who rushed onto the ground to greet Lloyd was treated roughly by the police. India’s first victory here was posted against the New Zealand two seasons later. The stadium has been witness to great innings like Gavaskar’s 205 against the Windies and Kallicharan’s 187 in the same game in the 1978-79 series and all round heroics like Ian Botham’s century and thirteen wickets in the Jubilee Test in 1980. which England won by ten wickets. The highest score by an Indian at Wankhede remains Vinod Kambli’s 224 against England in 1992-93 in only his third Test. Incidentally Ravi Shastri’s six sixes in an over off Baroda’s Tilak Raj en route to the fastest double-hundred in first-class cricket was on this ground in 1984-85. The home ground of Sachin Tendulkar, no other Indian venue has produced as many legendary cricketers as the Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai has. Barely a few meters away from the Brabourne Stadium, the Wankhede was constructed in a record 6 months time. Hosting internationals since 1975, the Wankhede Stadium, with a capacity of close to 50,000 has been witness to some epic performances –Ian Botham’s century and 13 wickets in the Jubilee Test in 1980 – the first time anyone had done the double of a century and 10 wickts in the same match – perhaps the stand out moment among many. The Wankhede was also the host to Ravi Shastri equalling Sir Gary Sobers’ feat of six sixes of an over in a First Class match. The stadium, now home to the IPL team Mumbai Indians, will undergo a reconstruction, so as to accommodate many more people for the Final of the 2011 World Cup, which it is scheduled to host. The seaside situation of the Wankhede stadium means that the swing bowlers get a fair amount of assistance during the early part of each day. The pitch has traditionally been full of runs, but it does help the spinners during the last couple of days, and in the last Test played on the ground, against Australia in 2005, the ball spun viciously from early on and this, coupled with low bounce, helped India win in under three days even though almost a whole day was lost to rain. The Wankhede stadium has stands named after famous Mumbai cricketers like Vijay Merchant, Sunil Gavaskar and Sachin Tendulkar. The cricket pitch of Wankhade Stadium is bowler’s favorite with spinners having an edge. It has also pace friendly track. Proximity to the sea ensures spin and bounce to the spinners on the ground. In the year 1995, Wankhede Stadium was upgraded to host day and night matches as well. Wankhede Stadium has adequately honored India’s cricket’s legend and hence the main gates to the ground are named after Polly Umrigar and Vinoo Mankad. The stands are named after famous Mumbai cricketers like Vijay Merchant (West stand), Sunil Gavaskar (East stand upper) and Sachin Tendulkar (North stand).

Owing to the proximity to the sea, Wankhede Stadium has ample sea breezes blowing through it; this aids the faster bowlers with early swings. Wankhede Stadium has a wonderful batting pitch and usually produces high scoring matches.When it comes to test matches, the Wankhede generally offers assistance to swing bowlers, during the early part of each day. However, as the Test match progresses, precisely during the fifth day of the match, the stadium becomes a vicious turner, making a fourth innings run-chase extremely difficult for a team. This is probably because of its proximity to the sea. The pitch is largely a spinner and pace friendly track. It offers spin and bounce to spin bowlers and swing to fast bowlers during the day time. This makes the matches more challenging for the team, which is on a run chase. This is the reason why some of the stadium has witnessed some of the most incredible Test innings in the history of cricket. Currently, the stadium is home to IPL team Mumbai Indians. Nowadays, Wankhede Stadium has ousted Brabourne Stadium in all respects. It has become the main cricket venue in the city and always stands in competition to host an international match in India. With a seating capacity of 45,000 spectators, the coliseum tenders a spectacular sight of cricket. The sports ground has been testimony to the great innings, for instance Gavaskar’s 205 and Kallicharan’s 187 in the 1978-79 series. It is the same stadium, which offered the grounds to the laudable events like Ian Botham’s century, thirteen wickets in the Jubilee Test and the win of England by ten wickets in 1980. Vinod Kambli is the highest scorer amongst Indian players, with 224 runs at the stadium, while Ravi Shastri had six sixes in an over on this ground in 1984-85. Its fine cricket pitch has been the favorite of spinners with its pace friendly track. As a fitting tribute to the famous test cricketers from Mumbai, Wankhede Stadium’s stands have been named after Sachin Tendulkar, Sunil Gavaskar and Vijay Merchant. Being close to the sea, the ground proffers spin and bounce to the spinners and swing to fast bowlers. In 1995, Wankhede Stadium was upgraded with lights, to host day and night matches. Subsequently, it made the venue for an India-Australia match in the 1996 Cricket World Cup. The coliseum has been assigned to host the finals of 2011 Cricket World Cup; due to this it would undertake a major renovation. livescore.warofcricket.com provides information on Wankhede Stadium Mumbai and other Grounds around the World.

Records at Wankhede Stadium Mumbai:

  • The highest Test total at the Stadium is 604/6 declared by the West Indies against India in the 1974/75 season.
  • The lowest Test total at the Stadium is 93, scored by Australia, when it played against India in the 2004/05 season.
  • India scored the highest ODI total at the Stadium. The team scored 299/4 against Sri Lanka in the 1986/1987 season.
  • Bangladesh scored the lowest ODI total at the Stadium. The team was 115 all out, when it competed with India in the 1998 season.
  • Ravi Shastri’s six sixes in an over off Baroda’s Tilak Raj en route to the fastest double-hundred in first-class cricket was on this ground in 1984-85.
  • The highest partnership scored at the Wankhede stadium is 298. D.B. Vengsarkar and R.J. Shastri partnered to put the score on the board, for India against Australia in the 1986-87 season.

How to Reach Wankhede Stadium Mumbai:

One can easily reach Wankhede Stadium by boarding buses or trains, or by hiring autos or taxis from the city.This stadium is very near to Churchgate station, just walkable distance of 10 to 15 minutess. But if you are coming from outside India (i.e coming from Mumbai Airport) then the distance is long and need to catch a local train heading towards south of Mumbai (Western Railway) Churchgate Station. Alternately there are options for cool cabs and taxi from Airport.This is one of the most prestigious stadiums of the country. It is located at Mumbai, in Maharashtra. Airway serves as a heavy mode of transport because the Mumbai International Airport lies close to the Stadium. The Church Gate railway station is at around 30 minutes driving distance from the stadium which helps the people visiting here to come by trains. People can also come by buses, cabs and private cars. Board a local or hire a taxi/auto or bus

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Brabourne Stadium Mumbai

General Information About Brabourne Stadium Mumbai:

  • Location: Churchgate, South Mumbai
  • Established in: 1937
  • Seating Capacity: 20,000
  • Owner: Cricket Club of India
  • Legend: Named after Lord Brabourne, Governor of Bombay Lord Brabourne, Governor of Bombay
  • Floodlights: Yes
  • End names: Pavilion End, Church Gate End
  • Home Team: Mumbai
  • First Test: India v West Indies – Dec 9-13, 1948
  • First ODI: Australia v Pakistan – October 23, 1989
  • Specialty: International Cricket Matches
  • Matches Played: 18
  • Matches Tied: 0
  • No Result: 11
  • Most Successful Team: India
  • Wins by Team Batting First: 2
  • Wins by Team Batting Second: 5
  • Most Prolific Batsman: Vijay Hazare (629 Runs)
  • Highest Individual Score: 293 by Virender Sehwag
  • Most Prolific Bowler: Bhagwat Chandrasekhar (34 Wickets)
  • Best Bowling Analysis: 7/157 by Bhagwat Chandrasekhar

More Information About Brabourne Stadium Mumbai:

The Brabourne Stadium is a cricket ground located near Churchgate railway station in South Mumbai. Owned by the Cricket Club of India (CCI), the Braborne Stadium houses the offices of the BCCI, the governing body of Indian cricket. The Brabourne Stadium was built on a piece of land reclaimed from the sea which Lord Brabourne, Governor of Bombay, presented to the Cricket Club of India after being tempted with an offer of immortality in the bargain. It was officially opened on December 7 1937 following with a match between the CCI and Lord Tennyson’s team. The idea that the ground would be the Lord’s of India (the Cricket Club of India was regarded as the county’s MCC) was the brainchild of a Goan, Neville de Mello. It was as exclusive as its English counterpart and every bit as luxurious – Frank Worrell once remarked that it was the only place in the world where he could watch cricket in his dressing-gown and remove it when it was his turn to bat. It was also a multi-sport complex which hosted international tennis. The Brabourne Stadium came up on a piece of land reclaimed from the sea which Lord Brabourne, Governor of Bombay, presented to the Cricket Club of India after being lured into an offer of immortality in the bargain. Foundation stone of the Brabourne Stadium was laid by Lord Brabourne, the Governor of Bombay, on May 22, 1936. The stadium formally opened on December 7, 1937 by Sir Lawrence Roger Lumley, the Governor of Bombay. The stadium got its name after Brabourne at the suggestion of the Maharaja of Patiala. But the ground had its problems, mostly notably with the crowds who were often crammed in beyond capacity, and that, allied to constant disputes over ticketing arrangements, led to the Bombay Cricket Association building its own stadium half a mile away. The ground was initially intended to provide covered accommodation for 35,000 audiences and contain pavilion, tennis courts and a swimming pool. The first match was played in the incomplete stadium in October 1937 between CCI and the Spencer Cup XI. Brabourne stadium hosted Test matches from 1948 to the 1972, as well as the Bombay Pentangular matches. After a dispute between CCI and MCA, the Brabourne Stadium ceased to be a major venue for international matches. Brabourne hosted seventeen Test matches, starting with two against West Indies in India’s first home series after the war in 1948-49. Vijay Hazare scored a hundred in each of his four appearances. 16 Ranji Trophy finals were played at the stadium between 1938 and 1973. Among the other notable innings played at the ground are Denis Compton’s 249 for Holkar in the 1944-45 final and Ajit Wadekar’s triple century in 1966-67 against Chandrasekhar and Prasanna. The Brabourne Stadium has lost its sheen now a days, and although it has hosted the occasional first-class match (Sachin Tendulkar made the first double century of his first-class career during Mumbai’s win over Australia in 1997-98). Brabourne hosted the Davis Cup Asia-Oceania second round Group match between India and Pakistan in April 2006. Brabourne was among the four grounds that hosted the 2006 ICC Champions Trophy. International Cricket returned to the ground almost after 11 years when West Indies and Sri Lanka played the sixth match in the qualifying round. The Cricket Club of India (CCI) came into existence as a company, on 8 November 1933. The then president of the BCCI – R.E. Grant Govan, was appointed as the President of CCI, while the then Secretary of BCCI – Anthony de Mello – served as the Secretary of CCI, from 1933 to 1937. Bombay Governor Lord Brabourne and Mello arranged talks to negotiate for the establishment of a new cricket stadium. This gave rise to the foundation of Brabourne stadium. The foundation stone of the stadium was laid by Lord Brabourne on 22 May 1936, after whom the stadium was named. During the time of its establishment, the Brabourne stadium had a seating capacity of 20000 spectators. It contained a pavilion, a couple of tennis courts and a swimming pool too. The first cricket match in the stadium was played between the CCI and the Spencer Cup XI, when the stadium was still incomplete. On 7 December 1937, the Governor of Bombay – Roger Lumley officially inaugurated the stadium. Thereafter, the inaugural first class match was played in the stadium, between CCI and Lord Tennyson’s XI. Brabourne stadium hosted its first Test match in 1948-49, when West Indies had played against India at the latter’s home series. Between a period extending from 1938 to 1973, as many as 16 Ranji Trophy finals were played at the stadium. Denis Compton’s 249 not out for Holkar in the 1944-45 final and Ajit Wadekar’s triple century in the 1966-67 season are some of the memorable records, which the stadium has witnessed. The highest Test total of 629/6 declared by West Indies against India in the stadium in 1948-49 remains fresh in the minds of cricket lovers. Brabourne stadium is a cricket stadium located in Mumbai, India. Owned by the Cricket Club of India, the stadium houses the headquarters of Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI). The stadium was named after the then Bombay Governor Lord Brabourne, at the suggestion of the Maharaja of Patiala. The Brabourne stadium used to be Mumbai’s first-choice ground for hosting international matches, until 1973, when it had a spat with the Bombay Association. Ever since the Brabourne Stadium was built in Mumbai, CCI did not maintain good terms with their tenants – the Bombay Cricket Association (BCA). The causes of the strain in the relationship were the disputes regarding the allotment of seats in the stadium. The anger aggravated, when in 1971, BCA was told not to allot extra seats for England’s tour of India in 1972. CCI asserted that it expenses a lot for the maintenance of the ground and any further concessions would result in heavy losses to the Club. With contrasting perception, BCA went on to construct a new stadium under the guidance of President S.K. Wankhede. This gave rise to the establishment of Wankhede, another stadium in Bombay. Since then, Brabourne staged only a handful of major matches, for about the following two decades. After a gap of 13 long years, international cricket was again played in the stadium, in 1989, when Pakistan played Australia in an ODI. However, when Bombay Cricket Association came up with the Wankhede stadium, Brabourne started missing the big games and had to be content playing host to first class matches. Go through the following lines to know more about Brabourne cricket stadium. The stadium is to be found near Churchgate railway station in South Mumbai. It also comprises the headquarters of the BCCI, which is the governing body of Indian cricket. The coliseum happens to be on a piece of land that has been reclaimed from the sea. It was offered to the Cricket Club of India by Lord Brabourne, who was the Governor of Mumbai (or Bombay) in those times. He himself laid the foundation stone of the stadium on May 22, 1936. The Brabourne these days has an air of faded splendor, and although it has hosted the occasional first-class match (Sachin Tendulkar made the first double century of his first-class career during Mumbai’s win over Australia in 1997-98). International cricket returned to the venue after a 11-year hiatus, when it hosted five 2006 Champions Trophy games. It was later named a Test venue for England’s tour of India in 2008, marking a revival after 35 years.On December 7, 1937, Brabourne Stadium was officially opened by Sir Lawrence Roger Lumley – the then Governor of Bombay. The stadium was named after Lord Brabourne, as recommended by the Maharaja of Patiala. Initially, the stadium was projected to have pavilion, tennis courts and a swimming pool, while providing sheltered accommodation for 35,000 spectators. In October 1937, the stadium, under construction, hosted its first match between CCI and the Spencer Cup XI. One of the oldest stadiums of India, it was established in 1937. This stadium seems to have lost its splendour now except for an occasional first class match that is played here. This ground is not as big when compared to the other grounds in Mumbai with a capacity of 20,000. The stadium was built on a piece of land which Lord Brabourne, the then Governor of Bombay, presented to the Cricket Club of India after being tempted with an offer of immortality in the bargain. It was officially opened on December 7, 1937 and hosted its first test from in 1948 between India and the West Indies. The ground was designed by Neville de Mello who wanted this ground to be the Lords of India. One Day International cricket was brought to this ground in 1989 when Australia played Pakistan. After it was built, the Pentangular shifted here from the Bombay Gymkhana in 1937-38 and it was here that the Vijay Merchant – Vijay Hazare rivalry was played out. When Wankhede was built, this ground completely lost its charm, until India played Australia in a T20 match in 2007.Brabourne Stadium is a cricket ground owned by the Cricket Club of India (CCI). Located in the bustling city of Mumbai, the stadium had been the host of the test matches from 1948 to 1972. Apart from the test matches, it made the venue for the Bombay Pentangular matches too. Subsequent to the argument between CCI and the Mumbai Cricket Association (MCA) in the early 1970’s, Brabourne Stadium didn’t make the arena for international matches. The Brabourne Stadium has a rich and fascinating history. After it was built,the Pentangular shifted here from the Bombay Gymkhana in 1937-38 and it was here that Vijay Merchant – Vijay Hazare rivalry was played out with no quarter asked and none given. In the 1943-44 final between Rest and Hindus, Hazare parried Merchant’s record 250 with an astonishing 309 out of 387, despite which Rest lost by an innings. Hazare also hit centuries in all his four Tests at Brabourne. Merchant never played a Test here but made over 35% of his career first-class runs on this wicket, including an unbeaten 359 v Maharashtra. Eleven of the 17 Tests here were drawn but there were some tense finishes – in 1948-49 against the West Indies, umpire Joshi removed the bails with 90 seconds left on the clock and India six short of a maiden Test win.

Brabourne stadium made a comeback, when it staged the ODI match, played between Australia and Pakistan, in 1989. Although the pitch was too slow for one-day cricket, the stadium managed to become the venue for a few more ODIs. Thereafter, a number of teams touring India started playing a match at the Brabourne. It went on to host the final match of the 2006 Champions Trophy. This was the time, when floodlights were installed at the stadium. In the recent past, it has hosted the first Twenty20 (T20) International, when India beat Australia in October 2007. During its peak period, Brabourne Stadium offered its grounds for at least seventeen test matches. Between 1938 and 1973, it saw sixteen finals that deserved Ranjit Trophy. The remarkable innings played at the coliseum are Denis Compton’s 249 for Holkar in the finals of 1944-45 and Ajit Wadekar’s triple century in 1966-67. Though the stadium has lost its patina, the faded grandeur still persists in the air. This Stadium is this place where Sachin tendulkar made is double century for the first time, and whole crowd in that stadium was shouting and clapping for the Young cricketer of India. Similarly lots of test matches has been played in this stadium. Another near by stadium is ‘Wankhede Stadium‘ which was built after a dispute between Cricket club of India and Mumbai Cricket association. Brabourne Stadium, once again, hosted the sporadic first-class match of 1997-98, where Sachin Tendulkar made the first double century of his career. The stadium is counted amongst the four grounds, which made the venue for 2006 ICC Champions Trophy. Almost after 11 years, the sports arena felt proud when the International Cricket revisited its ground in the sixth match of the qualifying round. The Brabourne Stadium, Mumbai was established in 1930 and named after the then Governor of Mumbai, Lord Brabourne. The stadium was home to the Cricket Club of India. However, there were constant disputes between the club and the Mumbai Cricket Association (MCA), which eventually led to the MCA constructing its own ground, the Wankhede Stadium a little away from the Brabourne Stadium. Wankhede was a better stadium in terms of facilities and had floodlights, which Brabourne did not. As a result of this the Brabourne Stadium gradually began to lose out to the Wankhede in securing international matches. However, domestic matches continue to be played here and most of the times the visiting international teams play a first class warm up match at this ground. A number of milestones in cricket have been touched at both the team level and individual levels, at the Brabourne Stadium. During the initial years of its inception, the highest Test total of 629/6 was declared by West Indies, when they played against India in the 1948-49 season. Another such record was set by B.S. Chandrasekhar, who achieved the best bowling figure in a Test match – 235/11 – against West Indies in 1966-67. Apart from the highest records, cricketers have also set some of the lowest records at the stadium, one being the lowest Test match total – 88 – by India against New Zealand, in 1964-65. The ground has been witness to quite a few memorable matches and innings, including Sachin Tendulkar’s first first-class double hundred. The feat came in 1997-’98 against Australia. The Brabourne Stadium was also the venue where Vijay Hazare and Vijay Merchant had their famous scoring rivalries. It has been more than a decade since international cricket has been played at the Brabourne Stadium. But the stadium got a new lease of life when it was selected as one of the venues to host the matches of the 2006 ICC Champions Trophy, the biggest honor having being awarded the final as well. So in preparation for the tournament, the ground is now undergoing renovation and floodlights are being installed.

How to Reach Brabourne Stadium Mumbai:

Board a local or hire a taxi/auto or bus.One can easily reach Brabourne Stadium by boarding buses or trains, or by hiring autos or taxis from the city.From Airport a person needs to get a Taxi (Cab) or alternately Local Train Towards south of Mumbai which takes about 45 mins in train and get down at Churchgate Station, and from there it can be said as walkable distance. Also see picture and Photos of Brabourne Stadium in some time later.

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